Kylix and three surgical instruments (B)

 290,00

price included: a. postage expenses b. luxurius wooden case / exhibit: c. safe transportation d.  all taxes included e. certificate of authenticity (handwritten signature)
Kylix and three surgical instruments

A. Double  Hook  (removing tonsils)

B. & C. Sharp hooks

D. Kylix 
Black-figure pottery painting in the center painted a snake.

Product Description

study – diligence: George Damianos
creation plans: Art and science gallery.com
design material: brass and ceramic (hande made)
artisti: Nikos and Panos and Eugenia
dimensions:A.: 14,5 cm B. 18cm  C.: 17,8cm D. 22,5 x 7cm (Kylix)
edition year: 2016
prototype year: Probably Roman period
based on: A. & B. & C.  National Arcaelogical museum, Athens 
copyright all over the wold: Art and science gallery.com

A. Double  Hook  (removing tonsils)

Better not ask what the children felt when they came across these medical tools orhow many fainted only in their views.

Real jewels though was a user tool to heal the pain and suffering. Rare finding.

The hooks were used by physicians to immobilize the edges of wounds, tissue sections, blood vessels, et al. They were also used to hold flesh together, as well as to raise up small pieces of tissue for excision, as, for example occurs when removing tonsils, where the hook was used to drag them outward, before they were excised (Paul of Aegina VI., xxx).

B. & C. Sharp hooks

Perhaps the most elegant tool, actual artwork could keep on hand the doctor at any time if he lived. Verification of Thucydides: “a daily source of pleasure and helps to banish the spleen;”

Such a sample is exposed to Athens, National Archaeological Museum.

COMMENTS

Sharp hooks were used by physicians to immobilize the edges of wounds, tissue sections, blood vessels, et al. They were also used to hold flesh together, as well as to raise up small pieces of tissue for excision, as, for example occurs when removing tonsils, where the hook was used to drag them outward, before they were excised (Paul of Aegina VI., xxx).

D. Kylix 
Black-figure pottery painting in the center painted a snake.
About the Snake
art and science gallery.com 33The snake figure was associated with Asclepios, the ancient Greek God of medicine, and possessed benevolent properties. It was believed to be able to cure a patient or a wounded person just by touch. The snake is also connected with pharmacology and antisepsis, as snakes possess an antivenom against their own poison. The snake is related to sciences associated with poison and death, such as toxicology and toxinology, and it also implies a metaphysical idea. It is connected with the underworld, not only because it crawls on the ground, but because it can bring death, connecting the upper with the underground world. The ability of the snake to shed its skin has been associated with the circle of life, and the renaissance spirit also, ever since early Hellenic antiquity. Consequently, as a symbol of the modern medical profession, toxicology and toxinology, the snake twisted around a stick or the snake beside a pharmapeutic cup, which also implies the use of medicines or even poison, has its roots in the ancient Mediterranean area as proven by the archeological data combined with literary references. Its benevolent as well as its poisonous properties could be paralleled by the similar properties of medicines.

About Kylix and black-figure ceramic (Greek, μελανόμορφα, melanomorpha)

Kylix, also spelled cylix ,
in ancient Greek pottery, wide-bowled drinking cup with horizontal handles, one of the most popular pottery forms from Mycenaean times through the classical Athenian period. There was usually a painted frieze around the outer surface, depicting a subject from mythology or everyday life, and on the bottom of the inside a painting often depicting a dancing or drinking scene. Kylikes were often produced in sets to accompany a wine serving vessel, or krater.

Black-figure pottery painting, also known as the black-figure style or black-figure ceramic (Greek, μελανόμορφα, melanomorpha) is one of the styles of painting on antique Greek vases. It was especially common between the 7th and 5th centuries BC, although there are specimens dating as late as the 2nd century BC. Stylistically it can be distinguished from the preceding orientalizing period and the subsequent red-figure pottery styl

reference
  1. Hygeia, museum of cycladic art
  2. Boudon-Millot, Véronique, Alessia Guardasole, and Caroline Magdelaine, eds. La science médicale antique: Nouveaux regards; études réunies en l’honneur de Jacques Jouanna. Paris: Beauchesne, 2007.
  3. Michaelides, Demetrios, ed. Medicine and Healing in the Ancient Mediterranean World. Oxford: Oxbow, 2014.
  4. Nutton, Vivian. Ancient Medicine. 2d ed. New York: Routledge, 2013.
  5. Schwartz, S.I., J.E. Fischer, F. C. Spencer, G.T. Shires, and J.M. Daly. Principles of Surgery, 7th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998
  6. Scarborough, J. 1968. Roman Medicine and the Legions: A Reconsideration. Medical History 12: 254-61.

John_Stuart_Mill_by_London_Stereoscopic_Company,_c1870

 

read also

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS
IN GREEK AND ROMAN TIMES
BY JOHN STEWART MILNE, M.A., M.D. Aberd.

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